Fibroid & Polyp Removal

Removal via hysteroscopy e.g. with MyoSure

Women who suffer heavy periods caused by fibroids or polyps can have these removed using a number of treatments including a hysteroscopic morcellation e.g. with Myosure. You can be considered for treatment if you are not pregnant, do not have pelvic infections or abnormalities of the cervix and do not have cervical cancer.

Hysteroscopic Morcellation

This is a minimally invasive procedure that is used to remove both fibroids and polyps. The procedure can be carried out using a local anaesthetic in an outpatients setting so you can go home the same day. The gynaecologist inserts an instrument, which removes the fibroids or polyps, into the uterus via the vagina. It usually takes 10 minutes to remove a fibroid of approximately 3 centimetres. You can usually resume your daily activities the following day.

Polyps can grow back, and the treatment therefore sometimes needs to be repeated. You can become pregnant following hysteroscopic morcellation.

Hysteroscopic Resection

This is a minimally invasive procedure that is used to remove both fibroids and polyps under a general anaesthetic. The gynaecologist inserts an instrument, which removes the fibroids or polyps, into the uterus via the vagina. You can usually resume your daily activities the following day.

Polyps can grow back, and the treatment therefore sometimes needs to be repeated. You can become pregnant following hysteroscopic resection.

Embolisation

If the fibroid is in the uterine wall, embolisation, where the blood vessels to the fibroid are cauterised or blocked, is often carried out. Blocking the blood vessels causes the fibroid to shrink over the next six months. The operation will involve a general anaesthetic, so you may need to spend a night in hospital.

If you plan to get pregnant in the future, you may choose not to have an embolisation, as there are potential risks to your fertility. You may need to repeat the procedure again.

If heavy periods are dictating your life and you’re unsure of their cause, book an appointment to see your GP. To get the most out of your appointment, take a look at the Talking to your GP section.

Benefits

  • Suitable for women who wish to have children
  • Uterus (wall) remains intact
  • Excellent rate of success
  • No pre-treatment required
  • Quick recovery
  • Reduces bleeding
  • #

Disadvantages

  • Requires local or general anaesthetic
  • Sometimes needs to be repeated
  • Contraception remains necessary
  • #

Features

  • For

    Fibroids or polyps

  • Treatment type

    Minor operation

  • Treatment duration

    An average of 10 minutes #

  • Conception

    Still possible

  • Recovery time

    1-2 days Mild pain, cramps and nausea may occur post-treatment. #

  • Success rate

    100% #

# relates specifically to the Myosure® hysterscopic morcellation procedure

Frequently Asked Questions about fibroid & polyp removal

  • How are fibroids and polpys removed?

    Women who suffer heavy periods caused by fibroids or polyps can have these removed during a minimally invasive procedure involving a hysteroscopy. New, minimally invasive technologies exist, e.g. Myosure, where you may even be able to be treated in an outpatient setting. You can be considered for treatment if you are not pregnant, do not have pelvic infections or abnormalities of the cervix and do not have cervical cancer.

     

     

  • What are Fibroids?

    Fibroids are non-cancerous growths that develop in or around the uterus (womb). Also known as myomas, leiomyomas or fibromas, they can occur singly or in large numbers. Fibroids are made up of muscle and fibrous tissues and vary in size – they can be as small as an apple pip, or as large as a grapefruit. There are different kinds, depending on where they are located.

  • What are the symptoms of fibroids?

    In general, fibroids are not dangerous. However, they can cause symptoms such as pressure on the bladder, lower back pain, pain during sex, period pain, bleeding between periods, and heavy bleeding.

    Fibroids can also affect fertility as they can stop fertilised eggs embedding into the womb, so making it harder for you to get pregnant. If you do manage to get pregnant multiple fibroids can:

    • block the vagina meaning a caesarean may be necessary to deliver the baby
    • increase the risk of miscarriage

  • What are polyps?

    Polyps are benign submucosal growths that are attached to stalks. They can occur in the uterus (womb) and the cervix (neck of the womb). Polyps grow in the lining of the uterus (endometrium). They are covered with the same tissue and look like little toadstools. While women with polys often experience no symptoms, when they grow in size they can start bleeding.

    Women are at increased risk of polyps in the uterus if they are aged between 40 and 50, are peri-menopausal, overweight, take tamoxifen (medication for breast cancer), have high blood pressure, or have polyps in the cervix.

* Stock Photo. Posed by model

1 IN 5 WOMEN SUFFER WITH HEAVY PERIODS

1 IN 5 WOMEN SUFFER WITH HEAVY PERIODS About 20% of women suffer from heavy periods (menorrhagia). It’s not always possible to identify a cause and the symptoms vary too. If heavy periods are taking over your life, it’s time to do something about it. Because you can.

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Talk to your GP

Talk to your GP

Be prepared! Make sure you get the most out of your GP appointment. Complete the questionnaire and period diary, it will help your GP understand your problem, so you can get the right treatment, quickly.

Read more
Experiences
    • Claire (58) Was suffering from multiple fibroids
      "My periods gradually got worse over the years as I got older. I just felt so tired all the time. When you feel tired, you don’t feel that you’re in the right state of mind!"
    • Anna (27) Had a fibroid
      "My periods had always been normal. Until about three years ago. I thought it would pass, but it only became worse. I eventually saw a gynaecologist.”
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